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View Full Version : The Police Will NOT Protect You!


Bard
09-27-2005, 03:14 PM
Do not count on the star men to protect you when real chaos comes along.
When real chaos sweeps this country, you will only have yourself, your gun, (if you haven't surrendered it) and your God!

http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20050927140909990003

Updated: 02:18 PM EDT
249 New Orleans Police Officers Left Posts
By JULIA SILVERMAN, AP

NEW ORLEANS (Sept. 27) - About 250 police officers - roughly 15 percent of the force - will be investigated for leaving their posts without permission during Hurricane Katrina and the storm's chaotic aftermath, a deputy police chief said Tuesday.

Deputy Chief Warren Riley said each case will be investigated individually to determine which officers were truly deserters and which had legitimate reasons for being absent.

"Everything will be done on a case-by-case basis. The worse thing we could do is take disciplinary action against someone who was stranded in the storm or whose child is missing," Riley said.

The officers who are on a list will be investigated by the department's internal affairs bureau and then referred to a review board that will likely include police commanders and civilians, Riley said.

Also on Tuesday, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals said 885 bodies of Katrina victims had been recovered, up from 841 as of Friday.

Mayor Ray Nagin told The Times-Picayune, which first reported the plan to review the missing officers' cases, that the city attorney's office will ensure that it falls within civil service regulations. The department has about 1,700 officers.

Lt. David Benelli, president of the Police Association of New Orleans, the union for rank-and-file officers, said true deserters should be fired.

"For those who left because of cowardice, they don't need to be here," Benelli told the paper. "If you're a deserter and you deserted your post for no other reason than you were scared, then you left the department and I don't see any need for you to come back."

But Benelli said he believes only a small fraction of the officers will wind up being deserters.

"We know there were people who flat-out deserted," he said. "But we also know there were officers who had to make critical decisions about what to do with their families.

Telephone calls from The Associated Press to the police department, the mayor's office and the police union were not immediately returned on Tuesday.

Some lost their homes and some are looking for their families. "Some simply left because they said they could not deal with the catastrophe," Riley said.

Tuesday marked the second day of the official reopening of New Orleans, which had been pushed back last week when Hurricane Rita threatened. Nagin welcomed residents back to the Algiers neighborhood on Monday, but imposed a curfew and warned of limited services.

A steady line of cars waited 20 to 25 minutes Monday to get through police checkpoints into the neighborhood of 57,000 people that largely escaped Katrina's destruction, said police spokesman Capt. Marlon Defillo. Defillo had no estimate of how many people had returned.

Only scattered handfuls of people even bothered to return to neighboring St. Bernard Parish. They came to salvage what they could from homes where the waters from Hurricane Katrina topped the attics, where mold is blooming on the walls and toxic sludge covers the floors. Many said they wouldn't be back, not after the double blow of Katrina and Rita, which reflooded parts of the parish.

"There's just too much devastation," said Dionne Thiel who wept in the middle of her block. "There's no way we could rebuild all this."

Nagin also invited business owners in the central business district, the French Quarter and the Uptown section to inspect their property and clean up. But he gave no timetable for reopening those parts of the city to residents.

Power has been restored to portions of New Orleans, including Algiers, the French Quarter and the Central Business District, said Entergy Corp. spokesman Chanel Lagarde. The utility planned to restore power to parts of Uptown on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, pumps were draining water from the Ninth Ward, an area reflooded by during Hurricane Rita. The water receded to 2 to 4 feet in the neighborhood by Tuesday, said Mitch Frazier, a spokesman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Associated Press writers Michelle Roberts and Dan Sewell contributed to this story.


09/27/05 14:07 EDT

browneyedK
09-27-2005, 04:58 PM
I probably shouldn't be posting here...BUT
This kinda hit home. This article made me realize what I've been doing for the past 2 days.

During Hurricane Rita...our town was a major escape route for thousands of people.

During the past 2 days I have been reading emails that have been sent to my office about the traffic jam here for 3 days. Our policeman were yelled at...spit at..had things thrown at them, when they were only doing their job.

What people percieve is due to frustration. I understand that. If these people who had complaints took the time to realize that ALL of Texas had these problems they would just count their blessing that they are HERE to complain about it~!

:mad:

Peregrina
09-27-2005, 09:56 PM
honestly, in their shoes, can you say you would have stayed in your place while worrying about your family? they are human, they have families and fears and worries. A woman I work with is one ofthe strongest women I know ,but she is terrified of water, can barely take a bath she is so afraid of drowning. it doens't make her a weak person or anything, just very human. I don't even want to think about what it must have been like, having to decide between protecting my family and strangers - especially since a lot of them probably weren't too thrilled to see the cops ,as brown eyes points out.

as for me, well, I wouldn't have been looking to them for help anyways. not anything against police or anything, but I never got into the habit of looking to other people to get me out of jambs of my own making. now, it they are there and offer a hand, I'm not too proud to take it! but I don't sit around waiting for that hand.

Mr. Lemon Pocket
09-27-2005, 10:21 PM
I'll agree with perineum.

If the whole place is coming down round your ears and is in total chaos, and you are, as a law enforcer, horribly horribly out-numbered concerning people who need help and who need correcting, with a family in dire danger or even missing on top of it to worry about, how can you begrudge them getting the hell out the sae as everyone else?

When the sky is falling, all bets are off.

whiteclouder
09-28-2005, 07:30 AM
I probably shouldn't be posting here...BUT
This kinda hit home. This article made me realize what I've been doing for the past 2 days.

During Hurricane Rita...our town was a major escape route for thousands of people.

Our policeman were yelled at...spit at..had things thrown at them, when they were only doing their job.


Woe be unto the person who yells or spits at a police officer around here, frustration or not. I saw footage of people in N.O., jumping up and down (literally), screaming obcenities and making threatening gestures towards the very people sent to help them; more like a pack of agitated baboons than civilized people. Makes me want to ask for my money back.

Cloud..

Bard
09-28-2005, 08:39 AM
They have, taken an oath, to protect and to serve, have they not?

Why is it not allright, for a soldier to run away then?

OldHubcap
09-28-2005, 08:50 AM
I know lots went wrong in Hurricane Katrina, but maybe we should give a hand to the 85% of the NO Police Force that stayed on the job in these gawd awful conditions.

Buckeye1sid
09-28-2005, 08:54 AM
Hubcap, that would be the RIGHT thing to do.

Bard
09-28-2005, 09:13 AM
They have, taken an oath, to protect and to serve, have they not?

Why is it not allright, for a soldier to run away then?

Can anyone address the soldier example?