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Bard
09-28-2005, 08:35 PM
Updated: 08:02 PM EDT
Idaho Confirms Third Death From Brain-Wasting Disease

http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20050928184909990019

By Laura Zuckerman, Reuters

SALMON, Idaho (Sept. 28) - Test results confirm a rare brain-wasting illness similar to mad cow disease claimed the life of a 53 year-old northern Idaho woman earlier this month, state health officials said on Wednesday.

The results bring to three the number of confirmed cases this year in Idaho of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, an incurable illness involving a malformed protein that kills brain cells.

Idaho officials believe a naturally occurring form of the disease is responsible for the three cases and may be involved in an additional four deaths this year.

Further testing is under way to rule out variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, considered the human form of mad cow disease and linked to eating beef from infected cattle.

The naturally occurring form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, whose cause is unknown and which is not contagious, typically is found at an annual rate of one case per million Americans.

Idaho, with a population of 1.4 million, already has exceeded the expected number of cases in a year, prompting concern among medical professionals.

"Any time you have more cases of a disease than you expect, you want to know why," said Cheryle Becker, epidemiology manager for Idaho's South Central District Health.

Becker's office has overseen the probe into two confirmed cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and is investigating two more suspected cases.

"For that part of the country, it seems to be an unusual number of cases," said Ermias Belay, a Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease expert with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The specter of mad cow disease has sparked alarm among some residents of a state whose industries include cattle production. Becker and others are cautioning the public not to overreact.

"We don't want to panic people about this," she said. "We don't have information that would cause people to change their lives in any manner."

Tom Shanahan, a spokesman for the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, said an analysis of data the agency has collected on confirmed and suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease victims shows few common denominators other than all were at least 50 years old and lived in Idaho.


09/28/05 22:46 ET

IndianPrincessSIP
09-28-2005, 08:37 PM
"We don't want to panic people about this," she said. "We don't have information that would cause people to change their lives in any manner."

Yeah ok :ohwell

stinky*felix
09-28-2005, 08:38 PM
Never mind. I misread.

Bard
09-28-2005, 08:40 PM
By Laura Zuckerman, Reuters

SALMON, Idaho (Sept. 28) - Test results confirm a rare brain-wasting illness similar to mad cow disease claimed the life of a 53 year-old northern Idaho woman earlier this month, state health officials said on Wednesday.


:thankyou

Blackeyedpeas
09-28-2005, 08:51 PM
Had to read this before I retire. This is getting me a bit nervous, as I am a dyed in the wool carnevore. Damn!! That tofu is starting to look good. :thud

bagbalm
09-28-2005, 10:14 PM
This wasting disease spreds to the deer from the Elk. It has for sure made it all the way to WI so - no more venison for me.

Bard
09-29-2005, 05:03 PM
Updated: 07:27 PM EDT
Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Moose

DENVER (AP) - A moose killed in northern Colorado has tested positive for chronic wasting disease, apparently the first of its species known to have contracted the disease in the wild, officials said Thursday.

An archer killed the moose Sept. 10, and testing confirmed the presence of the fatal neurological disorder, said Kathi Green, disease management coordinator for the state Division of Wildlife.

More testing is being conducted, but she said the test earlier this month is the same one used to confirm preliminary results in elk and deer.

Chronic wasting disease, a fatal and transmissible brain ailment similar to mad cow disease, has previously been found in several states and Canada only in deer and elk in the wild.

Scientists have found no evidence the disease can be transmitted to humans.

On the Net:

Colorado CWD site: http://wildlife.state.co.us/CWD/index.asp


09/29/05 19:26 EDT

Bleep
09-29-2005, 05:53 PM
whose cause is unknown and which is not contagious
bad, bad misinformation. :mad:

Jakob Creutzfeld disease is caused by a Prion- a small particle, smaller than a virus, that can replicate itself inside brain cells and causes them to pop and die- literally. The cause has been known at least 15 years. It IS contagious-but not very. You won't catch it from caring for a person with the disease, using their clothing from a second hand store, sitting on the same toilet seat, kissing them, etc. You might catch it from blood contact. There are proven cases of transmission from organ transplantation, and cadaver sourced human growth hormone has also been implicated. Fortunately, the disease is exceedingly rare ( in a year of doing Neurology in a big city hospital, I saw only 2 cases). But a terrible, terrible end.

Grace
09-29-2005, 08:59 PM
Scientists have found no evidence the disease can be transmitted to humans.

I have certainly read contrary to that. :winky

Why all ofa sudden are they telling hunters to wear gloves, when skinning their kill, and stay away from the spine and brain?

more on this later.
grace falling asleep